PULSE Miami Beach 2015

Indian Beach Park

Ramona Rosales & Joaquin Trujillo

December 1 – 5, 2015

PULSE Miami Beach 2015 (installation view)
PULSE Miami Beach 2015 (installation view)
PULSE Miami Beach 2015 (installation view)
PULSE Miami Beach 2015 (installation view)
Ramona Rosales, The Church, 2015

Ramona Rosales
The Church, 2015
archival pigment print
50 x 40 inches, edition of 3
40 x 30 inches, edition of 5
24 x 20 inches, edition of 5
 

Ramona Rosales, The Partridge Family House, 2015

Ramona Rosales
The Partridge Family House, 2015
archival pigment print
30 x 40 inches, edition of 5
20 x 24 inches, edition of 5
 

Ramona Rosales, The Chester House, 2015

Ramona Rosales
The Chester House, 2015
archival pigment print
30 x 40 inches, edition of 5
20 x 24 inches, edition of 5
 

Ramona Rosales, Make a Wish, 2014

Ramona Rosales
Make of Wish, 2014
archival pigment print
30 x 40 inches, edition of 5
20 x 24 inches, edition of 5
16 x 20 inches, edition of 10
 

Ramona Rosales, Olé, 2014

Ramona Rosales
Olé, 2014
archival pigment print
30 x 40 inches, edition of 5
20 x 24 inches, edition of 5
16 x 20 inches, edition of 10
 

Joaquin Trujillo, Tercer Ojo (Mexico), 2015

Joaquin Trujillo
Tercer OjO (Mexico), 2015
archival pigment print
24 x 16 inches, edition of 3
20 x 13.5 inches, edition of 3
9 x 6 inches, edition of 50
 

Joaquin Trujillo, Untes (Brooklyn), 2014

Joaquin Trujillo
Untes (Brooklyn), 2014
archival pigment print
40 x 32 inches, edition of 3
20 x 16 inches, edition of 5
 

Joaquin Trujillo, Sangriento (Mexico), 2013

Joaquin Trujillo
Sangriento (Mexico), 2013
archival pigment print
32 x 48 inches, edition of 3
16 x 24 inches, edition of 3
8 x 12 inches, edition of 5
 

Joaquin Trujillo, Tomates Tatemados (Mexico), 2015

Joaquin Trujillo
Tomates Tatemados (Mexico), 2015
archival pigment print
75 x 50 inches, edition of 3
45 x 30 inches, edition of 3
24 x 16 inches and 20 x 13.5 inches, combined edition of 5
 

Joaquin Trujillo, Leyendo El Café (Brooklyn), 2014

Joaquin Trujillo
Leyendo El Café (Brooklyn), 2014
archival pigment print
40 x 32 inches, edition of 3
20 x 16 inches, edition of 5
 

Joaquin Trujillo, Remedio Casero (India), 2012

Joaquin Trujillo
Remedio Casero (India), 2011
archival pigment print
40 x 32 inches, edition of 3
20 x 16 inches, edition of 5
 

Joaquin Trujillo, El Que Quiere Azul Celeste Que Le Cueste, 2011

Joaquin Trujillo
El Que Quiere Azul Celeste Que Le Cueste, 2011
archival pigment print
42 x 54 inches
Edition of 3
 

Press Release

For PULSE Miami 2015, De Soto Gallery will feature new works by Joaquin Trujillo and Ramona Rosales from their recent projects, Mal de Ojo (Trujillo) and Shelter (Rosales). Both artists create dramatically staged vignettes around the idea of home that speak to the very human impulse for myth-making and finding (or losing) meaning in our lives.

Trujillo’s Mal de Ojo (the “evil eye”) is based on his recollections of being gravely ill as a child in his hometown on the outskirts of Zacatecas, Mexico. When scarlet fever, thought to have been the result of a curse, nearly took his life and his eyesight, his family turned to the local curandero (healer) to save him. The series is in two parts: fetishistic portrayals of the artist’s trauma and tabletop arrangements of folk remedies and collections of personal amulets and totems. Often presented as diptychs or triptychs, the scenes deal with aspects of isolation, the need for protection, and the value of faith.  

In addition, selections from Trujillo’s Flores series will accompany the installation. These similarly symbolic remembrances of family and childhood are a tribute to the women (and a few men) that influenced the artist. Growing up between Mexico and the US, flowers filled the homes of Trujillo’s mother and sisters and were frequently used medicinally and as offerings. The careful arrangements borrow some of the sentiment of 19th century Victorian “talking bouquets” with deeply expressive coded messages. Together, Mal de Ojo and Flores, reflect Trujillo’s colorful worldview, echoing a structured slippage of heritage across culture, place, and time.

Rosales’ Shelter centers on notions of domesticity, particularly its articulation in film and television. Rosales cloaked the façades of houses on the fictional Blondie Street — an exterior set on the Warner Bros. backlot in Burbank, California that has been the location of countless movies and tv series — in brightly colored fumigation tents. The result is tantalizing, neatly packaged and candy-colored, and simultaneously oppressive and claustrophobic. The duality encapsulates the palpable surrealism of living in a media-dependent culture and locates humor in the absurdity of contemporary life.

Alongside the new work, a collection from Rosales’ last series, Outside the Lines, will be on view. Like the flip side of Shelter, Outside the Lines, takes another view of domesticity, with open-ended narratives of housewifely mishaps. Chromatically suggestive of Josef Albers and Henry Hensche, the images are designed as experiments to test how color affects the perception of a story.

Joaquin Trujillo (b. 1976, Los Angeles, raised in Zacatecas, Mexico) received his BFA from Art Center College of Design. His work is in permanent collections at San Francisco MoMA and the Amon Carter Museum and has been included in their recent exhibitions: Portraits and Other Likenesses (SF MoMA) and Color! American Photography Transformed (Amon Carter Museum). His work has been exhibited across the US, as well as in Mexico, Britain, and France. Trujillo splits his time between New York, Zacatecas, and Los Angeles.

Ramona Rosales (b. 1978, Los Angeles) received her BFA from Art Center College of Design. Known for her candid, offbeat portraits of celebrities, her work appears regularly in numerous publications including The Hollywood Reported, Billboard Magazine, and New York Times Magazine. Her work has been exhibited in the US and Mexico. She is based in Los Angeles.